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Top Ten Tuesday: Cozy Reads

It's time for another Top Ten Tuesday hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week's topic is "Cozy Reads." I don't find myself reading lots of cozy books unless they are mysteries and some of these might seem a little severe to some to qualify but I guess cozy is dependent sometimes upon the reader's taste. I like to get lost in series books with ongoing storylines and feel I'm getting to know the characters well. Hopefully some of these are cozy reads you'll want to try.   Christmas Mysteries Series by Anne Perry These books are great to read any time of year, not just at Christmas. You get a good mystery with engaging characters set in a charming location. It is not unusual for her to include some history along with it so you come away feeling a little more educated. Perry is always superb with authentic dialogue and atmosphere too. She ends every book with a feeling of resolution and a celebration of Christmas Day. I've read all but 3 of the 17

The Royal Stuarts by Allan Massie

Publication Date: December 20, 2011 Length:   384 pages My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ WHY I CHOSE THIS BOOK: I find very few books about Scottish Kings and Queens and even fewer that focus exclusively on the Stuarts. I've had this book in my Kindle for awhile and it is one I want to share because of the subject matter. Outlander made me obsessed with all things Stuart so this one was a must read. SUMMARY: Drawing on superb research, Massie covers the origins of the Stuart family running all the way from the 13oo's to the Jacobites of the 1700's. He starts with the background leading up to the first real Stuart King, Robert II from 1370-1390. Massie has a lot of ground to cover and divides the book into 17 chapters each title one of the Stuart monarchs. Each one is given a nickname describing his assessment of their reign and the reader can quickly navigate between them to get a general overview of the major points of their rule. He starts in Brittany in the 1100's as not much is k

Top Ten Tuesday: Characters I'm Thankful NOT To Be- Classics Edition

  Today I'm participating in Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl book blog. I've wanted to do this for awhile but hadn't found the time. I love the idea of posting top ten lists each week and while I may not get to all of them, it's still fun to try! This week in honor of Thanksgiving the topic is Thankful Freebie. Here is my top ten list of characters I'm thankful not to be. I loved this idea and have to give credit to Cindy at The Speedy Reader blog for this creative idea.  1.   Mrs. Danvers in Rebecca  by Daphne Du Maurier The creepy, clingy, obsessed head housekeeper of Manderly was not a happy lady. I was glad she didn't win in the end.  2. Melanie Hamilton in Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell I always felt sorry for poor Melanie. She's too sweet and compliant....she gets taken advantage of left and right and then dies in the end. I can't help it...I always preferred to be Scarlet! 3. Oliver in Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens T

Murder In Mesopotamia (A Hercule Poirot Mystery) by Agatha Christie

  Publication Date: July 6, 1936 Length:  288 pages My Rating:  ⭐⭐⭐⭐☆ WHY I CHOSE THIS BOOK: Okay so I fully admit this reason is pretty pointless but I loved the title and the cover. That's the honest truth. Having read the first Elizabeth Peters book set in Egypt amid an archaeological dig site and loved it, I figured this book might have that same flavor. I wanted to read another Poirot mystery since my last review was Miss Marple. So when I saw this book for a great price I had to buy it! Some of Christie's books just don't appeal to me due to the setting and I'm pretty picky about which ones I will try. Also, this one doesn't seem to be super well known (at least I'd never heard of it) and I wanted to review a book not as renowned.  SUMMARY: Our story begins with a foreword written by a Dr. Reilly, M.D., which is designed to seem like an introduction to the actual story, written by the main character, Nurse Leatheran. At Dr. Reilly's prompting, Miss Lea

My Top 10 Favorite Series Books of 2022

  Don't you just love books that are part of a series?  The idea that you have another waiting to read when you already love a book and all its characters so much is a comforting feeling. At least it is for us bibliophiles, although occasionally I hate the pressure I feel to finish them all. That's just never gonna happen!  I thought this week I'd list my top 10 favorite series books of 2022. I could probably do this post several times a year because I'm always starting new ones. What are your favorite series books? 1. Verity Bright's Eleanor Swift Mysteries Wonderful cozy mystery series set in 1920's England. Eleanor, her beloved butler Clifford, and her trusty bulldog, Gladstone solve mysteries while charming everyone  in the quaint village of Chipstone. I have read the first three in this series and can't wait to read the next Christmas themed one soon. These just make you feel happy. 2. Anne Perry's Thomas Pitt Mysteries Thomas and his wife Charlotte

Isabeau, A Novel of Queen Isabella and Sir Roger Mortimer (The Isabella Books Book 1) by N. Gemini Sasson

  Publication Date:  September 7, 2010 Length:  428 Pages My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐☆☆ WHY I CHOSE THIS BOOK: This was my second book to read by N. Gemini Sasson. I previously reviewed her book about Owain Glyndwr of Wales and it was one of the only books about him I've seen in novel form. Likewise, I haven't seen much about Isabella in fiction and honestly not much about Edward II or Roger Mortimer either. All of these people are new material for me as I don't know much about the three Edwards or the 1300's in general. Listening to the History of England podcast I'm up to this time period and their story sounded fascinating. So I thought I'd give this book a try. SUMMARY: Our story opens in 1308 as the young Isabella of Boulogne, France is wed to Edward II of England. She is 12, he is 23 and a new King, unimpressed with his child bride. He presents as a brooding, unattentive husband and Isabella hopes with time this will change. Edward is easily influenced by those around

What Book Made You Love Reading?

  I remember loving my third grade classroom so much. Maybe that's why I taught third grade for 13 years. It was where I really discovered my love of reading and when I was able to really delve into the story part, not just the word calling. By the time I reached fifth grade I was an avid reader. I'd gone through all the SRA lab colors (if you grew up in American public schools in the 80's you remember SRA reading lab) and was always looking for something new to devour. My teacher let us have free reading time often and she had several books that were part of a series called Sunfire. Each one featured a girl living through a different historical time period and she always had two loves to choose from. They were always polar opposites and the heroine had to decide where her heart lay.  Susannah by Candice F. Ransom was the first one I read. I still own my old copy and have probably read it a dozen times over the years. I remember being mesmerized by the cover. Her dress, the